Monday, July 21, 2014

Simple blossom

One of the things I really love about embroidery is that I am constantly discovering, developing and changing the way I do things. I rarely have a set plan of how I will achieve a certain look - just a vague feeling of what I wish to achieve - and sometimes you just need to think outside the square a little bit.

My first inclination for the cup of these blossom was to use satin stitch - but I wanted them to have some texture and really good definition of the edge of the shape, and I know satin stitch would just make them look soft and 'fluffy. Turning the design upside down, I realised the edge was formed by two 'V' shapes - the perfect shape for fly stitch.


I then continued to place fly stitches very closely side by side to cover one half of the shape. Then the other in the same way. Quite simple but effective, I think.


The blossom on the other hand, I did want to be soft and delicate. So apart from choosing a very pale colour yarn, satin stitch was the obvious choice here. To make the edges slightly raised and rounded, I first placed tiny split stitches along the outline. I don't always work split stitch under satin stitch - it does help get the outlines really neat though.
Dividing the shape into sections helps get the direction of the satin stitch correct across the entire shape.
Then just fill in the gabs. Filling a slightly tapered shape like this is so much easier in wool than if you are using silk or cotton. The wool is so much more forgiving - you simply space the stitches a little further apart along the wider edge. The wool will neatly fill the space.


To divide the petals, I wanted something a little more substantial than a straight stitch over the top. A straight stitch would easily partly disappear into the underlying satin stitch. The solution was a detached chain placed partway over the blossom and the anchoring stitch all way over the edge.
To finish off - a few trusty old pistil stitches for the stamens at the top...


...and there, a delicate little blossom using just a few simple stitches. Perhaps it gives you some ideas of how to use a few different stitches next time you embroider a flower.

Happy Stitching,
Anna x

PS - did you wonder about the dotted outlines? Dots are so much easier to disguise and cover with stitches than solid lines...

17 comments:

  1. Mmm, yes, dots are a good idea. I usually find that I can cover the lines OK as long as I remember to stitch right over them. Many make the mistake of bringing the needle up on/through the line and so it stays visible.

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  2. Just simply beautiful! Your hand and eye for beauty is astounding! Thank you for sharing your technique and thoughts

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  3. You make it look simple! Thank you for showing us the stitches you used to make the pretty flowers. Another of your beautiful projects to follow and learn from. Thanks!
    Dianne

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    1. Thanks Dianne, I am glad you find it helpful.

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  4. Wow! I'm so happy to have come across your blog. I've learned a lot already form this post alone and enjoyed seeing your beautiful work. The photos and descriptions you've included in this post are really fantastic! Thank you!

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  5. It has been forever since I did embroidery...you inspire me to pick it up again. Beautiful!

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  6. Embroidery is something I've always wanted to do, amidst many other ventures. So glad to know that you offer such great advice and guidelines here. What a fantastic piece of work you have here! This artform always reminds me of the doilies and pillow cases of my youth. :D

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    1. Oh yes, doilies and pillow cases... they have their own charm, but I am not sure I will be venturing down that road in a hurry.

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  7. It is just so beautiful. I feel like diving into embroidery right now.

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  8. Beautiful! I like the other flowers as well your embroidering on this piece. I used to do embroidering and loved it. I love the colors too!

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  9. Oh Anna, I used to embroider so many years ago and reading your blog makes it all come flooding back and miss it terribly. There is something about the texture, the stitching, the feel of a product after you are done stitching - love touching it. And, all of those designs and possibilities.

    I think I'm needing to go back to it.

    I'm so glad I came here.

    Shari :-)

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    1. I'm glad you came here too.
      yes, I think it is the tactile-nes of it that I love as much of the endless possibilities of colours and stitch combination. Always something new to learn and discover.

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  10. Oh this is beautiful … said from and fellow embroidarian ( just made that up ) .. Not sure if you knew that embroidery has been creeping back into my art lately and do I ever find soothing and satisfying artfully. When people say to me that it must be tedious and laborious to do all that tiny stitching, I just smile. It's magic to create these images.

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    1. No, I had not seen the embroidery in your pieces until now (swung right over and had a look)
      I often get comments that I must be awfully patient - I am possibly one of the most impatient people around, only when I stitch to I gear right down.

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  11. I love the tie in of the colours between the blossoms and the bird.

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Your comments are really special to me! - Thank you so much for taking the time and please bear with the word verification. Anna